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Education and Communication Strategies: Tying It All Together

To create and deploy compelling ethics and compliance education and communication experiences, one must obtain support within the organization. These educational experiences will cost more than the traditional methods of the past. The good news is that investment in education and communications activities, along with a focus on values-based leadership, collaboration, engagement, and culture, all produce a positive return on investment. Cultural change does take commitment, persistence, and patience. Once started, positive cultural changes can snowball, and organization members will be more engaged, satisfied, and productive. People will demonstrate ethical behavior, while business performance will improve. Professors John Kotter and James Haskett, in their 1992 book Corporate Culture and Performance, describe tremendous performance improvement in organizations with collaborative environments.

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Topics: Ethics and Compliance Education, ECA Risk Forecast Report 2013, Communication

An Effective Approach to Ethics and Compliance Education

The steps below will help create the compelling educational and communication experiences that will influence people and cultures at emotional and intuitive levels.

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Topics: Ethics and Compliance Education, ECA Risk Forecast Report 2013, Ethics & Compliance

The Latest Education and Communication Research: Preparing to Meet the Risks

In their 2011 book Blind Spots, professors Max Bazerman (Harvard Business School) and Ann Tenbrunsel (University of Notre Dame) write about how people act against their own ethical values, and how they aren’t as ethical as they may think they are. The situations the authors describe are more common than you might realize. Their research data clearly show how people, when asked about a difficult or confrontational situation, say they will act ethically. This is what they “should” do. In the real situation, they choose the non-confrontational or easy path, and act unethically. This is what they “want” to do. When asked to recall how they acted, they engage in a form of revisionist history and describe what they did as ethical. After all, in seeing themselves as ethical people, they couldn’t have engaged in unethical behavior. You can imagine how this line of reasoning could move people onto the “slippery slope” of seeing unethical behavior as actually being ethical.

The authors also presented data showing how over 50% of respondents said they would act a certain way when facing a situation, and yet when they actually encountered the situation, none of the respondents acted the way they predicted. It’s clear that people intend rather than demonstrate ethical behavior.

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Topics: Ethics and Compliance Education, ECA Risk Forecast Report 2013, Communication

The Past and Present of Education and Communication Strategies: Why Are We At Risk?

The risks associated with ethics and compliance education and communication may seem minor when compared to the risks of FCPA (Foreign Corrupt Practices Act), ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations), lobbying, or insider trading violation. The reality is that ineffective and outdated education and communication methodologies coupled with complacency from knowing that all employees have received their annual refresher training actually increases the risk of misconduct and violations of law.

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Topics: Ethics and Compliance Education, ECA Risk Forecast Report 2013, Ethics & Compliance

Bringing Life to The Working Dead

About seven years ago, I was sitting near the front of a conference hall filled with my LRN colleagues for our annual “kick-off” to the new year, listening to our CEO Dov Seidman unveil his new “TRIP” theory (a theory he later placed smack dab in the middle of his book, How. He posited that in order to thrive in this hyper-connected, hyper-transparent world, you needed to TRIP. Unsure of what he was talking about, we laughed. A lot. It’s not every day you hear your CEO make an LSD reference. Then he clarified, explaining how “Trust enables Risk, which leads to Innovation, which creates Progress.”

TRIP.  

Now, I’m not normally one for acronyms, but this particular one struck me. I found it deeply resonated with me, particularly the emphasis on Trust. Not just trust extended to you by individual colleagues or an organization as a whole, but also the trust one has in oneself. As years passed, I’d often relate this concept of TRIP to others, adding my own little take on the importance of trust: Without Trust, there is no TRIP, there’s just RIP (a grave marker for the death of innovation.)

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Topics: Ethics and Compliance Education