MakingWaves Blog
  1. LRN Home
  2. About

Marshall McLuhan was Never More Right: Why How We Communicate Matters More than Our Message

If you ever had any doubt about how the medium really IS the message, I would like you to take this simple test. Think about the last time you had to say something difficult to someone: you’re fired, I don’t love you anymore, you have disappointed me. How much time did you think about the words? And how much time did you consider the timing and the means by which you would tell them – in person, by email, a note left on the counter? And where, when?

Read More

Topics: Communication, HOW, Corporate Culture

Education and Communication Strategies: Tying It All Together

To create and deploy compelling ethics and compliance education and communication experiences, one must obtain support within the organization. These educational experiences will cost more than the traditional methods of the past. The good news is that investment in education and communications activities, along with a focus on values-based leadership, collaboration, engagement, and culture, all produce a positive return on investment. Cultural change does take commitment, persistence, and patience. Once started, positive cultural changes can snowball, and organization members will be more engaged, satisfied, and productive. People will demonstrate ethical behavior, while business performance will improve. Professors John Kotter and James Haskett, in their 1992 book Corporate Culture and Performance, describe tremendous performance improvement in organizations with collaborative environments.

Read More

Topics: Ethics and Compliance Education, ECA Risk Forecast Report 2013, Communication

The Latest Education and Communication Research: Preparing to Meet the Risks

In their 2011 book Blind Spots, professors Max Bazerman (Harvard Business School) and Ann Tenbrunsel (University of Notre Dame) write about how people act against their own ethical values, and how they aren’t as ethical as they may think they are. The situations the authors describe are more common than you might realize. Their research data clearly show how people, when asked about a difficult or confrontational situation, say they will act ethically. This is what they “should” do. In the real situation, they choose the non-confrontational or easy path, and act unethically. This is what they “want” to do. When asked to recall how they acted, they engage in a form of revisionist history and describe what they did as ethical. After all, in seeing themselves as ethical people, they couldn’t have engaged in unethical behavior. You can imagine how this line of reasoning could move people onto the “slippery slope” of seeing unethical behavior as actually being ethical.

The authors also presented data showing how over 50% of respondents said they would act a certain way when facing a situation, and yet when they actually encountered the situation, none of the respondents acted the way they predicted. It’s clear that people intend rather than demonstrate ethical behavior.

Read More

Topics: Ethics and Compliance Education, ECA Risk Forecast Report 2013, Communication

HOW You Communicate is Just as Important as WHAT You Communicate

<Enter a corporate conference room where a colleague is presenting a new idea.> Utilize efficient convergence! Integrate robust paradigms! Repurpose sticky platforms! Streamline leading-edge functionalities! Leverage turn-key methodologies!

Read More

Topics: Communication