Tips on Training Introverts and Extroverts on Compliance - Interactive Services

November 21, 2016
LRN Corporation

Your company has come up with policies that ensure compliance, and you want to be certain your employees understand and will follow the policy. Most likely, your company has coworkers who are extroverts and introverts. Carl Jung first discovered these terms in his psychological research, and in recent decades tools such as The Myers-Briggs Type Indicated popularized the terms.

The terms extroversion and introversion define how people interact and get energy from the world. Extroverts get their energy from interacting with people and the world at large, while introverts feel energized from more solitary pursuits. Often, a training will engage extroverts but not introverts, or vice versa.

 

Here are a few compliance training tips for engaging extroverts:

Allow for opportunities to speak during the training, instead of just lecturing. Ask students questions they can raise their hands and answer, and allow specific times for questions and feedback during the training.
Allow for absorption of the material through interactive group activities. This could be a simulation about a compliance situation, or a Jeopardy style trivia game.
Make sure the training moves relatively quickly and covers points succinctly, to ensure extroverts don’t get bored.

 

And here’s how to help introverts learn:

To help introverts learn independently, give employees lecture notes with some words not filled in. Challenge students to independently fill in the blanks, and have a prize for the person who completes it the fastest.
Along with group games, do exercises in the training that allow for independent reflection, such as writing a response or taking a self-assessment to test knowledge.
When giving time for questions and discussions, allow participants to also write questions you’ll answer later. Don’t require any employee to speak in the training; you can check introverts’ understanding by looking at their written work and self-assessment.
The best workplace compliance trainings incorporate exercises that benefit extroverts and introverts.

 

With a balanced training, all of your staff will be engaged and learn effectively. Contact us for help designing a compliance training.

About the Author

LRN Corporation

Ethics and compliance leader providing tools, education, and advisory services for global companies to inspire principled performance. LRN’s overall approach recognizes the inherent limitations of rules and regulations in influencing behaviors. In our view, focusing on actions that help build and maintain a values-based culture will mean more compliance and reduced costs as a result of tangible and sustainable behavioral change.

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